Why does someone raise their voice at other person/s in the workplace?

Some staff will raise their voice in the workplace to express or release frustration or anger. The release of wrath onto another person/s would be a breach of the organisation’s Code of Conduct and should not be tolerated or condoned.

There is a time to raise your voice in the workplace….only when the distance between the speaker and the receiver or the volume of background noise is such that one or more others, cannot satisfactorily hear the information you are communicating to them.

However, there is no reason to raise your voice in an effort to force someone to understand or agree to what you are saying.

Yet, we often witness the second situation playing out in a workplace. How does the raising of a voice achieve one of both of these goals? Is the receiver not in a position to best understand what is being said because they are distracted? Does the raising of volume get the attention of the listener and encourage them to concentrate? Perhaps it does. Is there another communication method, one that is respectful, which could achieve this same outcome – like stating the listener appears to be distracted and you would appreciate their attention?

I am of the opinion that more often than not, voices are raised in the workplace because the person imparting the information has not;

  1. Formulated the content of their statement in a manner that assists the listener to understand (and has not sought to re-formulate the content or thought to present the information in a different format); or 

  2. Structured their negotiation/presentation to successfully influence the listener to agree with them.

Either way, the responsibility to not raise one’s voice, and to successfully formulate and articulate their communication content sits with the speaker.

If the volume of the speaker’s voice is not proportional to the distance their voice needs to travel, then raising one’s voice demonstrates in the speaker, their lack of self awareness and their lack of effective communication skills.

Is there a leader in your workplace who would want to be identified in this way?

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