Whistleblower Changes - Getting Your Policies Right

With the new changes to whistleblower legislation soon to be debated and enacted, it's essential to assess whether or not your business is compliant. An important part of ensuring compliance with the changes lies in the development of robust policies to protect whistleblowers. The Human Resources function has a central role in preparing staff for the new approach to whistleblowing in the workplace. 

We examine best-practice policy development for the support of whistleblowers in the workplace, including compliance hazards to watch out for as the new legislation takes effect. 

RECAPPING THE CHANGES

We have previously examined the architecture of the new regime, due to be enacted in early 2019. The proposed changes to legislation emphasise the need to not only protect workplace whistleblowers when they speak up, but to penalise organisations that fail to provide protection from harm. As part of these new requirements, whistleblower policies must be current, workable and robust. Tokenist policies and procedures that fail to effectively protect whistleblowers are no longer acceptable. 

HOW CAN HR GUIDE THE PROCESS

The most important focus for Human Resources departments will be the development and maintenance of a whistleblower-friendly culture: This is a good news story, the government has recognised the importance of whistleblowers in the fight against corporate wrongdoing and has acted in a positive way to encourage and support this practice. 

In developing quality training, in-house publicity, policies and procedures, HR needs to ensure that they guide staff and management towards a more supportive and knowledgeable stance in relation to whistleblower protections. 

BEST-PRACTICE IN POLICY DESIGN - ARE YOU COMPLIANT? 

In view of the legislative changes due to be delivered, organisations are clearly required to 'get their house in order' when it comes to the development and maintenance of appropriate policy instruments. It is not sufficient for example to have policies that merely provide lip service to the ideal of whistleblower protections. 

There must be clear and user-friendly mechanisms for anonymous reporting and disclosure - even if there is a mere suspicion of corruption, graft, fraud or other foul play in the organisation. 

Importantly, it is no longer necessary to approach a direct supervisor to report an issue - the new legislation reflects a growing understanding that ostracism and discrimination can and does occur if a whistleblower is limited in terms of reporting mechanisms. 

Now is the time to examine your organisation's policies around whistleblower protection, to establish if they comply with the widened scope of the new legislation.

COMPLIANCE HAZARDS TO WATCH OUT FOR

In developing the mechanisms to protect whistleblowers, there are a number of potential pitfalls to be aware of. Firstly, organisations can be liable if they fail to prevent harm to a whistleblower as a result of workplace reprisal. Reporting structures must be watertight in terms of anonymity and discretion. The smallest leak can lead to significant emotional and career harm for those brave enough to blow the whistle. 

A second related hazard is policies that are too general to be of any real use to potential whistleblowers. Policy documents should clearly and distinctly answer the 'what, how, who, when' of whistleblowing; when time is of the essence, it is important that staff can act immediately with their concerns. Further, whistleblower policies and training should explain clearly to all staff the repercussions for any harm caused to a whistleblower due to their disclosure. The key is a strong culture, where encouragement and protection of whistleblowers is a core element of business-as-usual.

HOW WISE'S GRAPEVINE HOTLINE CAN HELP

WISE is well versed in the changes of the whistleblowing legislation, and has recently published a whitepaper that can help answer all your questions regarding these changes. In addition, we have a whistleblower hotline, known as Grapevine, which has been running since 2016. The service is entirely professional and anonymous, and available 24/7 to concerned whistleblowers.

If you would like to know more or would like a cost estimate to implement our confidential hotline in your workplace, contact WISE now. By including the Grapevine Whistleblower Service in your whistleblower policy framework, your organisation can go a long way to fulfilling its requirements under the new legislation.

WISE Workplace is a multidisciplinary organisation specialising in the management of workplace behaviour. We investigate matters of corporate and professional misconduct, resolve conflict through mediation and provide consultation services for developing effective people governance. 

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